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A35992 The compleat ambassador, or, Two treaties of the intended marriage of Qu. Elizabeth of glorious memory comprised in letters of negotiation of Sir Francis Walsingham, her resident in France : together with the answers of the Lord Burleigh, the Earl of Leicester, Sir Tho. Smith, and others : wherein, as in a clear mirror, may be seen the faces of the two courts of England and France, as they then stood, with many remarkable passages of state .../ faithfully collected by the truly Honourable Sir Dudly Digges, Knight ... Digges, Dudley, Sir, 1583-1639.; A. H.; Walsingham, Francis, Sir, 1530?-1590. 1655 (1655) Wing D1453; ESTC R22010 544,817 462

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in this Book INstructions for Sir Francis Walsingham sent Ambassador into France 1 Sir William Cecil Lord Burleigh to Sir Francls Walsingham 5 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir William Cecil ib. Q. Elizabeth to Sir Francis Walsingham ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir William Cecil 6 To the Earl of Leicester 7 The Queen to Sir Francis Walsingham 9 The Queen to Sir Henry Norris ib. Doubts of Sir Francis Walsingham 17. c. Sir William Cecil to Sir Francis Walsingham 18 Instructions by the Queen to Sir Francis Walsingham ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 2● To Sir William Cecil ib. To Sir Walter Mildmay ib. Sir Henry Norris and Sir Francis Walsingham to the Queen 22 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir William Cecil 26 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir William Cecil 28 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 28 29. Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir Walter Mildmay 30 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir William Cecil 31 Monsieur Pinart to Sir Francis Walsingham 32 Sir William Cecil to Sir Henry Norris and Sir Francis Walsingham ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir William Cecil 33 Earl of Leicester to Sir Francis Walsingham ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 34 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir William Cecil ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 35 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir Walter Mildmay 38 Sir William Cecil to Sir Francis Walsingham 39 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir William Cecil ib. The Queen to Sir Francis Walsingham ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir William Cecil 42 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir William Cecil ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 43 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir William Cecil 45 Earl of Leicester to Sir Francis Walsingham 47 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 48 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir William Cecil ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 50 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham ib. Earl of Leicester to Sir Francis Walsingham 51 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 52 Sir William Cecil to Sir Francis Walsingham 53 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 55 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 56 The Queen to Sir Francis Walsingham ib Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 57 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord of Burleigh 58 Instructions of the Queen concerning the Match with France 62 c. L. Burleigh to Sir Fr. Walsingham 66 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 67 Earl of Leicester to Sir Francis Walsingham 71 The Queen to Sir Francis Walsingham ib. L. Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 72 Sir Francis Walsingham to the L. Burleigh ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the L. Burleigh 73 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 76 The Q. to Sir Francis Walsingham ib. Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 78 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 79 Sir Francis Walsingham to the L. Burleigh 81 Lo. Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the L. Burleigh ib. Earl of Leicester to Sir Francis Walsingham 82 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester ib. The Q. to Sir Francis Walsingham 83 L. Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 87 L. Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the L. Burleigh 88 The Q. to Sir Francis Walsingham 93 L. Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 94 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh ib. Earl of Leicester to Sir Fr. Walsingham 96 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester and L. Burleigh 97 The Queen to Sir Francis Walsingham ib. Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 100 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 101 Sir Francis Walsingham to the L. Burleigh 103 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 104 Earl of Leicester to Sir Francis Walsingham 105 The Queen to Sir Francis Walsingham 106 L. Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 108 Sir Francis Walsingham to the L. Burleigh 109 Earl of Leicester to Sir Francis Walsingham 110 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh ib. The Queen to Sir Francis Walsingham 111 Earl of Leicester and Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 115 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 115 Earl of Leicester to Sir Francis Walsingham 116 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 117 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir William Cecil 118 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 119 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 120 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 121 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 123 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 127 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 129 Earl of Leicester to Sir Francis Walsingham ib. The Queen to Sir Francis Walsingham ib. L. Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 134 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 135 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord of Burleigh 136 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 137 L. Burleigh to Sir Fr. Walsingham 138 Earl of Leicester to Sir Francis Walsingham 139 L. Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 140 Sir Francis Walsingham to the L. Burleigh 141 Sir Francis Walsingham to the L. Burleigh 144 The Q. to Sir Francis Walsingham 145 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 146 Earl of Leicester to Sir Francis Walsingham ib. Instructions for Hen. Killegrew Esq Ambassador in France during the absence of sir Francis Walsingham 147 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 149 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 150 Sir William Cecil to Sir Francis Walsingham 151 Sir Francis Walsingham to the L. Burleigh ib. Lo. Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham twice 152 Earl of Leicester to Sir Francis Walsingham 153 Instruction for sir Thomas Smith Ambassador Entraorninary in France 154 Sir Francis Walsingham to the L. Burleigh twice 160 Lord Burleigh to Sir Thomas Smith 161 L. Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 163 L. Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 164 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham twice 165 Sir Thomas Smith and Sir Francis Walsingham to the Queen 166 169 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 172 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 173 Sir Francis Walsingham to the L. Burleigh 174 Sir Thomas Smith to the Queen 176 The Queen to Sir Francis Walsingham 180 Sir Francis Walsingham to the L. Burleigh 182 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 184 The Q. to Sir Thomas Smith and Sir Francis Walsingham 185 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 187 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 188 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 189 Earl of Leicester to Sir Francis Walsingham 190 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh ib. Sir Tho. Smith to the Lord Burleigh 191 Sir Tho. Smith to the Lord Burleigh 193 Sir Tho. Smith to the Lord Burleigh 198 Sir Tho. Smith to the Lord Burleigh twice 199 Sir Tho. Smith to the Lord Burleigh 200 Sir Tho.
Smith to the Lord Burleigh 202 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh ib. Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 203 Earl of Leicester to Sir Francis Walsingham ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 204 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh ib. The Queen to Sir Francis Walsingham 205 Instructions for the Earl of Lincoln Ambassador extraordinary to the French King 206 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 212 Earl of Leicester to sir Francis Walsingham ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 213 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 214 Conference betwixt Duke Montmorency and some of the Queens Councel ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir William Cecil 216 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester ib. Sir William Cecil to Sir Francis Walsingham 217 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester ib. Sir William Cecil to Sir Francis Walsingham 218 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir William Cecil ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 219 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir William Cecil 221 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 222 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir William Cecil 223 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 224 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir William Cecil ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir William Cecil 225 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester ib. The Queen to Sir Francis Walsingham 226 Q. Elizabeth to Sir Francis Walsingham 228 Sir William Cecil to sir Francis Walsingham 230 Sir Tho. Smith to Sir Francis Walsingham ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir Tho. Smith 231 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir Tho. Smith 232 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir William Cecil ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 234 The Queen to Sir Francis Walsingham 235 Sir Tho. Smith to Sir Francis Walsingham 236 Sir William Cecil to Sir Francis Walsingham 237 Sir Tho. Smith to Sir Francis Walsingham 238 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir Tho. Smith 239 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir Tho. Smith ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir Tho. Smith 240 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir Tho. Smith 243 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 245 Lord Burleigh Earl of Leicester Sir Francis Knowles Sir Tho. Smith to Sir Francis Walsingham 246 Lord Burleigh to sir Francis Walsingham 250 251 Earl of Leicester to sir Francis Walsingham ib. Sir Tho. Smith to sir Francis Walsingham 252 253 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lords of her Majesties Councel ib. The Queen to sir Francis Walsingham 259 Sir Tho. Smith to sir Francis Walsingham 262 The Queen to the French King on the behalfe of the Vidam of Chartres 263 Lord Burleigh to sir Francis Walsingham 264 Earl of Leicester to sir Francis Walsingham ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to sir Tho. Smith 265 Sir Francis Walsingham to sir Tho. Smith 267 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 269 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 270 Answers to the French Ambassador 271 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 273 Sir Tho. Smith to sir Francis Walsingham 274 Sir Francis Walsingham to sir Tho. Smith 275 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir Tho. Smith 276 twice Sir Francis Walsingham to sir Tho. Smith 278 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 281 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 282 Sir Tho. Smith to Sir Francis Walsingham ib. The Lord Burleigh to sir Francis Walsingham 283 Earl of Leicester to Sir Francis Walsingham 284 285 Sir Francis Walsingham to sir Tho. Smith 86 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 287 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir Tho. Smith ib. Earl of Leicester to sir Francis Walsingham 288 Lord Burleigh to sir Francis Walsingham 289 Sir Francis Walsingham to sir Tho. Smith ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 290 Sir Francis Walsingham to sir Tho. Smith 291 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 292 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 293 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 294 Sir Francis Walsingham to sir Tho. Smith 295 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 296 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 297 The Queen to Sir Francis Walsingham ib. Sir Tho. Smith to Sir Francis Walsingham 299 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 301 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir Tho. Smith ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 302 Sir Francis Walsingham to the L. Burleigh 303 Sir Francis Walsingham to the L. Burleigh 304 306 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir Thomas Smith 307 Sir Fr. Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 308 Sir Francis VValsingham to the Lords of the Council ib. Sir Thomas Smith to sir Francis Walsingham 310 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham ib. Earl of Leicester to Sir Francis Walsingham 311 Sir Francis Walsingham to sir Thomas Smith 312 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 313 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 314 Sir Thomas Smith to Sir Francis Walsingham 315 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 316 317 Instructions for the Earl of VVorcester 318 Earl of Leicester to Sir Francis Walsingham 322 Sir Thomas Smith to sir Francis Walsingham 324 Sir Francis VValsingham to the Earl of Leicester 325 Sir Francis Walsingham to sir Thomas Smith 326 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 327 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 328 Sir Francis Walsingham to sir Thomas Smith 329 331 332 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 333 Sir Thomas Smith to sir Francis Walsingham ib. Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 334 Answer of the Queen to the French Ambassador comcerning the Duke Alanson 335 Lord Burleigh to the French Ambassador 3●9 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 343 Sir Francis Walsingham to sir Thomas Smith 344 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Leicester 345 Sir Thomas Smith to Sir Francis Walsingham 346 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 346 347 The Queen to Sir Francis Walsingham 348 Answer to the French Ambassadors ib. The Queen to King Henry of France 351 Instructions for Sir Francis Walsingham in his second French Ambasiy 352 353 c. For a League with France 355 Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir Henry Cobham and Mr. Sommers 356 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh ib. Sir Henry Cobham to Sir Francis Walsingham 357 Francis of Valois Duke of Anjou and Alanson to Sir Francis Walsingham 358 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 359 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Queen 360 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 363 Lo. Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 372 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 374 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 375 Sir Francis Walsingham Sir Henry Cobham John Sommers to the Lord Burleigh 376 Lo. Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 377 379 Sir Francis Walsingham Sir Henry Cobham John Sommers to the
potentissimum principem fratrem nostrum charissimum Gallorum regem residenti salutem Cum in tractatu qui inter Legatos nostros ad praedictam Principem missos ejusque serenissimi Regis Deputatos intercedit de amicitia pace renovanda augenda quae inter praedictum regem nos nostraque regna dominia subditos existit certi articuli de mercatorum nostrorum hinc inde comerciis negotiatione propositi fuerint de quibus propemodum quidem inter utrumque convenit nisi quod ante praefatam rei consummationem necessarium sit quosdam tàm à nostro quàm à praedicti regis parte constitui qui cum mercatorum prudentium consilio deliberent sintne illi articuli satìs ad rem aptè amplè compositi an vero alios quosdam immitores adjici expediat quibus commercii negotiorum ratio commodius regi exerceri possit Nos igitur de homine ad hanc rem idoneo cogitantes deque tua prudentia virtute industria in res nostras fide confidentes mandatorum procuratorum seu deputatum nostrū creamus constituimus per praesentes ut cum consilio principalium nostrorum si qui in illis partibus fuerit cum Regis praedict deputatis agas tractes unaque cum illis ea consideres statuas quae ad co●tinuendam augendam commercii intercessus necessitudinium necessaria vid●buntur Itemque de mertium vectigalibus tributis porteriis impositionibus iisque conditionibus quae ad mercatorum comertii libertatem securitatem pertinebunt rationes ineas Deque iis omnibus nos certiores facias ut re prope inspecta considerata quod é re fuerit decernamus concludamus quod ipsum simile à dict ' regis Legato hic fiet qui simile vicissim ab ipso rege mandatum habiturus est Et generaliter ut ea omnia tractes facias quae ad hanc rem necessaria erunt in tam amplis modo forma ac si in singulis magis speciale Mandatum haberes In cujus rei testimonium has litteras patentes ●ieri sigilli nostri impressione communi missimus Dat. in Regia nostra sancti Jacobi die mensis Maii Anno Dom. 1572. Regni vero nostri 14. Instructions given to the Earl of Lincoln Lord Admiral of England and one of the Lords of her Majesties privy Councel appointed by her Majestie to repair to the French King in Ambassage and at his arrival at Paris or elsewhere to be assisted for the execution of the matter underwritten with Sir Th Smith Chancellor of the Order and Fr. Walsingham Ambassador resident for her Majesty with the French King at St. Iames May 25. 1572. THe said L. Admiral shal have with him both Commission under the great Seal of England authorizing him and S. Th. Smith and Fr. Walsingham and Letters also to require the French K. to confirm the last treaty concluded at Blois by his oath whereupon he shall proceed first after his access to the K. obtaining by the Ambass resident for the demand of the said oath as is meet for the honor of the League of amity now concluded between their Maj. using therein all good speeches to assure him that according to such express words as are contained in the same Treaty for a mutual love and amity to be hereafter used and maintained between them her Maj. is fully bent in her heart to maintain the same on her part the rather because she doth assuredly hope that the K. wil do the like whereof his Maj. by his Ambass that he hath sent in the time of the late Treaty and negotiation of the same shewed many manifest arguments of his own special favourable directions of matters at sundry times resting in doubt between her Commissioners and his Maj. to more reasonable ends as appeared then otherwise would have 〈◊〉 ordered by his Ministers And so the L. Admiral having in this manner assured the K. of her Maj. ful and resolute determination to imbrace and hold fast this mutual amity he shal say that his coming thither is to visit the K. on her Maj. behalf and to attend upon his leasure and best oportunity to be present and to receive the K. oath to be made for ratifying of the said Treaty according to a clause in the said Treaty for that purpose And when the K. shal have accorded thereunto the said L. Admiral shal before hand percase by som privat conference had with some of the Secretaries of the State how and in what sort the ceremonies therof shall be observed so as the proceeding may be at the time at the solemnity thereof without any alteration And for the better proceeding herein the Lord Admiral shall have with him both Articles of the Treaties requiring the said oath and the manner form of like oath given by the said K. heretofore in like cases And the instrument also to be demanded in writing for testimony of the said oath with such other things as are thereto requisite so as the like manner may be used as near as may be agreeable to former usages and that there be with him present to assist him S. Th. Smith and the Ambass resident if they may be there to help And as for the place where the said oath should be given the said L. Admiral shal not refuse any that the K. shal appoint foreseeing only that he be not by reason thereof compelled to be present at any Mass to be said for the purpose but if it be in Church or Chappel he shal not refuse to require to take it in the same Furthermore although there is no other cause special of the sending of the L. Admiral at this time to the said K but to require his oath yet for that there may be many occasions offered of speeches in the matters where it shal be looked for that the said L. Admiral should answer the said K. to his satisfaction Therfore he wil in these things following accommodate himself as hereafter is mentioned wherein the said L. Admiral shal as occasion shall serve take the help of Sir Th. Smith who is also herein well acquainted In the matter of Scotland although the said L. Admiral be privy in what sort her Maj. hath hitherto proceeded so as he may by consideration thereof conjecture what is likely further to be her Maj. meaning yet to make her case the more plain he may wel hold opinion tht her Maj. meaneth not any thing more then that the Realm of Scotland may be brought to quietness and remain free from any invasion of any stranger wherby the liberty of that Crown and Nation should be impaired And he may wel remember of his own knowledge how often times since the Scotch Q. coming into our Realm we have bin wel disposed to have obtained an accord betwixt her and her Subjects but always when we were most earnest to have done her pleasure therein she
Lord Burleigh 380 Memorial for Mr. Sommers 384 Private Memorials for him 385 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 386 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Queen 387 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 388 389 390 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Queen ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh twice 392 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 392 394 Sir Francis Walsingham Sir Henry Cobham John Sommers to the Lord Burleigh 396 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh ib. Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 397 Points accorded and not according upon the League Offensive and Defensive 400 401 402 403 Sir Francis Walsingham Sir Henry Cobham John Sommers to the Lord Burleigh ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 407 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh ib. Sir Francis Walsingham to the Duke of Anjou 409 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 410 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 412 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 413 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 414 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham Sir Henry Cobham and John Sommers 419 Lord Burleigh to Sir Francis Walsingham 422 423 Answer to the Commissioners concerning the League Offensive ib Sir Francis Walsingham to the Queen 426 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 428 Conference betwixt the Queen Mother and Sir Francis Walsingham 429 Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Burleigh 434 439 Sir Francis Walsingham Sir Henry Cobham John Sommers to the Lord Burleigh ibid. NEGOTIATIONS OF STATE AFFAIRS BETWEEN The Lord Burleigh and Sir Francis Walsingham in the Reigns of Qu Elizabeth and Charls the 9. of France Anno Dom 1570. Instructions for Francis Walsingham Esquire sent by the Queens Majesty to the French King for the Matters following the 11 of August 1570. in the 12 year of Her Majesties Reign ELIZABETH R. FIrst you shall conferr with our Ambassador Sir Henry Norris knight upon this Charge now committed unto you and as you two shall think best to proceed therein for our Service so we are well content to allow your doings and for the repair and delivery of our Letters to the French King and to the Queen Mother with such other circumstances thereto belonging you shall also follow the advice and discretion of our said Ambassador The charge which we doe commit to you resteth only and principally upon this speciall Matter following whereunto we will that you direct your whole actions We desire that the Accord betwixt the King our good Brother and the Prince of Navarre Prince of Condé and the Admirall with the rest of the Company being the Kings Subjects might be made as favourable for the reasonable contentation and surety of the said Princes and their party as may be possible to the maintenance and continuance of them in the liberty of their Consciences for the cause of Religion And because we consider that there is no small labour made by some directly to impeach this accord and by some others though not openly to withstand is yet by doubtfull dealing in the granting to their Requests to ruine the said Princes and their party in the end We finde it the more necessary for us to use all good means to countervail such contrary labours and to procure not only a good Accord but therewith a continuance thereof as a matter which in our Conscience and Honor we think good both for the King and his whole Estate And therefore after you shall understand the state of the Negotiation of this matter by the Deputies of the two Princes with the King and wherein it shall be profitable for them that our Ambassador and you shall deal with the King or Queen-Mother in our Name Our meaning is you shall in this manner or the like declare our Intentions as Grounds whereupon you may lay the rest of our Reasons and perswasions that shall be thought good to be propounded to the King First you shall say that we earnestly request the King to set apart all manner of Jealousie that either hath been or may be insinuated to him of our meaning in this cause betwixt him and his Subjects for that we mean as well and so alwayes have to him and his Estate as if we were his naturall Sister and never had any intention to maintain or comfort any of his Subjects against him to move any trouble to his estate or to diminish any parcell of his Crown And yet you shall say That we will in this sort be plain with him thinking yet best to agree with good Friendship and Honor that we could never be well satisfied or content in our minds to have the said Princes and their party for professing of the Religion whereof they have freedom granted to them to be overthrown or distressed by means of partiality of their private Enemies as long as they never required in substance any other thing of the King then a permission to enjoy the benefit of the former Edicts granted unto them for the exercise of their Religion In the which we doe also consider that they had been so long suffered as a great portion of people of his Realm had been in their young years therein nourished and established and without opinion of damnation of their souls they could not change the same so as we pray the King to take this our plain dealing in good part and to interpret of our advice that we are bold to give him as one that meaneth first and principally best to him and his estate and no otherwise to his Subjects then shall in our Judgment further the quietness repose and augmentation of him in Honour Wealth and Surety You shall next to this say that we have partly considered of such Petitions and Demands as we be informed his Subjects have in most humble sort required to be granted to them And we note the substance of them to consist specially upon these points The first that they may be restored to his favour and grace as most humble and faithfull Subjects a thing most meet for a King to be granted both readily and bountifully and consequently to serve him with their lives lands and goods a thing also for a King most profitable to imbrace accept And the next that they may be permitted to serve almighty God by exercise of Christian Religion according to their Profession and to quietness of their Conscience a thing also in the sight of God most commendable and needfull of all Christian Subjects And last that they may have assurance hereof in some better sort then by former experience they have had a matter of most moment to be regarded for a full perfection of all the rest and without the which the rest are of no account In these Suits most humbly presented of Subjects to a most Christian King of so great a multitude of People consisting of such sundry kinds and estates of Princes of his blood of noble Captains of learned men meet for Government and Counsel of valiant
that one Merchant in this Town hath 14000 C●owns to be employed in that behalf To the Right Honourable and my very good Lord the Earl of Leicester MY very good Lord I leave to my Lord of Buckhurst to shew you how every way he hath b●n honourably entertained therefore in this behalf this onely will I say That such hath bin my Lords good demeanour as also of the Gentleman of his train as the King and his Court resteth very well satisfied and giveth both him and them great commendations protesting that sithence his coming to the Crown there was not an Ambassador of like Honosur here which I do not learn at those hands that will report otherwise then they hear to speak that which may best content us but from them at whose hands I do assure my self to have received the truth and for the increase of this good report he spareth to use no cost or liberality to such as by the King appointment have given attendance on him Touching other things the Duke of Longueville is lately departed from the Court with discontentment for that the Precedentship is adjudged to the Duke of Nemours protesting That so long as the Queen Mother liveth he will not come to the Court for he judgeth her to be the cause thereof I heare secretly that there is not the best liking between the two Queens whereof the young Q. is like to have the worst by common judgement for that here whatsoever our Mother commandeth taketh place and standeth for law And therefore if her Majestie desire to take any profit of France she must onely be the Messias and Mediatour I could therefore have wished that her Majestie had amongst other things bestowed some Present upon her The Kings Request unto the Pope for Count Galli●●zos delivery is quite rejected who protesteth That if all the Hugonots in France were incamped about Rome he would not deliver him The King with this proud and disdainfull answer is very much offended I would he would give the Hugonots leave to make some proof what they could do for his delivery Touching a Bull set up against the Queen the Kings discontentment therewith and certain requests presented by the Spanish Ambassador here to the King I referre your Honour to Mr. Secretaries Letters And so leaving further to trouble your Honour I most humbly take my leave Paris the 5 of March 1570. To the Right Honourable Mr. Francis Walsingham the Q. Majesties Ambassador in France SIr I would not suffer this bearer passe without my salutations Master Beal● came this morning by whom and by your Letters I have understood from you such things as are of moment and so have I imparted them to her Majestie and mean as shortly as I can to procure answer for the return of the bearer her Majestie as there is good cause alloweth well of your service and so I bid you well to do and heartily thank you for your singular care and good will which you shew unto my Lord of Rutland who advertiseth me of very countifull From Westminster primo Martii 1570. By your assured as I was wont William Cecil And as I am now ordered to Write William Burleigh Sir Henry Norris maketh friendly report of you to her Majestie and to all others I write not to my Lord of Buckhurst because I think he is on the way To my very loving friend Sir Francis Walsingham Ambassador Resident for the Queens Majesty in France MY Lord Ambassador since my last Letter unto you I have little new matter worth the writing saving now we are much troubled with the Scotish causes the Commissioners of both parties are now here to write unto you what the end will be certainly as yet I cannot we find both sides very stiffe and hitherto those for the Kings partie very resolute for the maintenance of his Authoritie her Majesties scrupulosity touching his Title and Government we partly know The unworthiness of their Queen to rule she granteth but the instances of their cause to depose her from her dignity she can hardly yet be perswaded in so yet she remaineth much perplexed on the one side she is loth to set her up or to restore to her her estate again On the other side she is as loth to defend that which she is not well perswaded to have justice with it Between these her Counsell chiefly seek for these two things that her self may be preserved in suretie and the true Religion maintained assuredly For as the state of the world standeth and upon through examination of this cause it appeares that both the waies be dangerous touching the Q. of Scots for there is danger for delivering of her to her Government so is there danger in retaining her in prison her friends abroad begin to speak proudly for her we were wont also to have friends of our side if need were but as farre as I can see there is none of that side of the sea to be found that be Princes absolute well our case is the harder and we must say Si Deus nobiscum quis contra nos Touching this matter as soon as it shall grow to any likelihood either of the one side or of the other I will advertise you and withall send you the reasons of the advice In the mean time whatsoever you may hear believe me there is no man in England can tell you which way it will go yet in respect of the King there and his continuall dealing for the said Q. her Majestie rather giveth in words more favorable that way then the other Mr. Norris is arrived here yesterday being Shrove-sunday when Mr. Secretary was created Baron of Burleigh and I think ere it be long shall have the office of privie Seal but as yet remaineth Secretary still and within a day or two Sir Thomas Smith is like to be called to assist him The Parliament is to begin the 2 of Aprill next the Queen Majestie thanks be to God is in very good health so are all your friends as you left them save Sir Nicholas Throckmorton our good friend Your wife was here lately to take her leave of her Majestie who used her very well and graciously I pray you let us hear as often as you can conveniently I would gladly understand of some good for the poore Cardinall Chastillion I desire and also long to heare of the Q. Majesties present how it is liked Thus with my hea●tie commendations I bid you heartily farewell the 26 March 1570. Your assured Friend R. Leicester To the Right Honourable my very good Lord the Earl of Leicester BY your Lordships of the 26 of February I find that there is some entrie made in the Scotish matters and that you see them so full of difficulties as whether on retaining or releasing there should be more safety you can hardly di●cern things well weighed as well at home as abroad The common opinion of such as are of judgement here and wish well unto her Majestie
discretion and secresie to deal in a matter of such consequence In the end having finished this point to leave the better taste with her of the matter I concluded being so warranted by my instructions that if this motion of hers should take effect the like never happened these many hundred yeares in respect of the great profit that would redound to both the Realms To this she answered that as she never desired any thing with like earnestness as she did this so if the same should not take place nothing could more grieve her For saith she besides the great benefit that will grow hereby unto both the Crowns on the successe of this match dependeth the quietness of all Europe This being all the talk that passed between Queen Mother and me I leave to trouble your Lordship any further humbly taking leave From Paris the second of Aprill Francis Walsingham To my very friend Sir Fr. Walsingham Ambassador for the Queens Majestie in France I Have upon the receipt of your Letter written by Sir E. Gilbert dealt with her Majestie touching your chargeable dwelling there I trust her Majestie will have due consideration thereof You shall perceive by her Majesties Letters her further pleasure touching Monsieur whose cause hath been broken to her by my Lord of Buck from the Queen Mother we perceive they deal very daintily and doubt much her Majesties intention to marriage at least that she had rather hear of it then perform it But assuredly I do verily believe her Majesties mind herein is otherwise then it hath been and more resolutely determined then ever yet at any time before yet doe they mean to deale so secretly on that side as though they will not yet believe it And accordingly her Majestie mindeth not to deal but as privatly as may be devised that if that should not take effect the lesse reproach is to either party her Majestie hath onely broken this matter with my Lord of Burleigh and me and I think will not use any more till some apparance fall out what is like to become of the matter The person of Monsieur is very well liked of his conversation is harder to know I see her Majestie misliketh not of his estate For she is of mind to marry with the greatest and he is left almost alone the greatest to be had The conditions will be all wherein I am right glad and we are bound to thank God to see her Majestie so well to stand to the maintenance of the cause of Religion For as there will be no great difficulty in respect of his person and estate to cause a marriage between them so yet I perceive with the impeachment any way of the true Religion here now established she will for no cause deal with him as you may perceive by her Majesties own Letters to you Albeit she doth not mean in respect of his policy to drive him in open shew in the mean time to renounce his own profession but conditionally that if they should match then wholly to maintain this aswell privatly as publiquely God send her Majestie alwaies during her life so to stand to the defence of so just a cause and withall his blessings upon her for us all that we may live and see her bring forth of her own body as may hereafter suceed her aswell in that happinesse as in the enjoyning of her kingdome So not doubting but we shall shortly hear from you I commit you to God In hast this 23 of March 1571. Your assured friend R. Leicester To our trusty and right welbeloved Francis Walsingham Esq our Ambassador Resident with our good Brother the French King ELIZABETH R. TRusty and welbeloved we greet you well we have seen your Letters of the 11 of this moneth written to the Lord of Burleigh our Secretary and perceive thereby your diligence in exploring further certain matters practised in Spain where you formerly wrot your doings wherein we doe well commend you and according to our former resolution whereof we lately advertised you we do now send unto the King of Spain this bearer our servant Henry Cobham one of our Gentlemen Pensioners for whose speedier and surer passing thither we have directed him to passe by you both to conferre with you and to utter unto you certain things from us wherein you shall give him credit and also to procure from the King our good Brother his passport and surety to passe throughout that Realm into Spain and likewise to return wherein we pray you to use some diligence to obtain the same for our said servant as you can consider the cause doth require we have instructed this said bearer of the Queen of Scots cause and have willed him to impart the same to you and having well conceived it we would have you there to let the Queen Mother understand so much thereof as shall be meet that she may know our sincere dealing therein And in your speech to her you may say that we do somewhat marvell that she doth so often sollicite and presse in the said Queen of Scots cause considering that we have not omitted to do any thing for her benefit which time and commodity would yield and that with reason we might do And specially we do the more marvell of the late urging of us therein considering the motion of the matter which she lately uttered to my Lord of Buckhurst Given under our Signet at our Mannor of Greenwich the 26 of March 1571. in the 13 yeare of our raign To the Queens Majesties Ambassador in France Mr. Fr. Walsingham my assured friend AFter I had sealed up my other Letters with Mr. Cobham I received yours of the 18 by Mr. York whereof I thought good to give you knowledge I am also to ascertain you that although the contrary may be reported my Lord of Leicester finding just occasion thereto doth by all good means to my knowledge further the marriage and therefore I think it reason that by such good means as your self may think meet both the Q. Mother and Monsieur de Anjou might understand his disposition so as he may be well thought of herein And if he find that his doing may be liked there if God be content with the cause it is very probable that it may take effect you see how plain I deal with you and the rather because I find by my Lord of Buckhurst that upon the hope you have of the amendment of Monsieur in Religion you do not mislike of the matter Surely if Monsieur be not rooted in opinion of evill Religion as by his young years it is not likely there might be argument made that marriage here with England would be becoming a Professor of the Gospel considering the towardness of him to be a Martiall Prince he may prove a Noble Conquerer of all Popery in Christendome with such aids as may joyn with him in the Empire and other where I wish he were capable of such a designe You see still the more I
move the same but finding now that he hath secretly named me for that place I do coldlie● deal therein knowing both my insufficiency and doubting of the success thereof but whether any shall come or who shall I surely cannot gess The Queens Majestie would have you to enquire what becometh of Liggons my Lord of Norfolks servant that hath of long time been about Paris and the Court. Here is some matter presently discovered that my Lord of Norfolk should still mind this matter of the Scotish Queen for there is intercepted a good portion of money in gold that was and by Letters in Cypher directed to my Lord of Harrife for help of the Scotish Queens party in Scotland and the same was sent by one Higford the Dukes Secretary who was by order from hence taken and committed at London and this day is examined by Sir Thomas Smith who yesterday went thither for that purpose What will follow I cannot now write but sorry I shall be that my Lord of Norfolk shall be found undutiful and yet if he be I am glad it shall be known and so I end with my prayer From Audeley-Inne by Walden the second day of September 1571. Your assured Friend William Burleigh I send you something from Scotland whereby you may see how small the Queen of Scots party is in Scotland To the Right Honourable and my very good Lord the Lord of Burleigh IT may please your Lordship to advertise her Majestie that according to her order prescribed me by her Letters